[copperpress-advertserve-ad-reload zone="3"]
 July 1, 1999

OSHA to reduce needlestick injuries

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) estimates 590,000 people are injured by needlesticks each year — many from medical objects that can potentially carry blood-borne diseases.

In May, OSHA announced a three-pronged approach to minimize the risk of exposure to needlestick injuries — placing all needle injuries on OSHA logs, revising enforcement to reflect newer and safer technologies and amending the blood-borne pathogen standard.

The administration’s action came in response to a report, “Record Summary of the Request for Information on Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens due to Percutaneous Injury,” issued on May 21 summarizing the comments of nearly 400 health-care facilities, workers and others on how to reduce the risk of injury from contaminated needles and sharp objects.The report is on OSHA’s Web site at www.osha.gov.

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) estimates 590,000 people are injured by needlesticks each year — many from medical objects that can potentially carry blood-borne diseases.

In May, OSHA announced a three-pronged approach to minimize the risk of exposure to needlestick injuries — placing all needle injuries on OSHA logs, revising enforcement to reflect newer and safer technologies and amending the blood-borne pathogen standard.

The administration’s action came in response to a report, “Record Summary of the Request for Information on Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens due to Percutaneous Injury,”…

[copperpress-advertserve-ad-reload zone="3"]

Related Content

[copperpress-advertserve-ad-interstitial zone="30"]