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 July 30, 1999

CU, CSU should sort out roles

One envisions a statewide center for the study of growth in Colorado; the other has created a center for the study of the Colorado economy. Both efforts, by the University of Colorado and Colorado State University, respectively, could also fold in contributions from the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley and the University of Denver.

Such centers, operating cooperatively, would deserve the unqualified support of business and government leaders, as well as the general citizenry.

But let’s sort a few things out: Who will bring what to the table? Who will perform what role?

The center for the study of growth, an effort led so far by CU, has valuable support from key business leaders in Northern Colorado. What remains to be seen is how much participation we’ll see by CSU, UNC and other centers of higher education.

Similarly, CSU’s Center for Research on the Colorado Economy offers bold new prospects for forecasting the economic climate of the state as a whole, as well as particular regions within Colorado. But how will it conflict or complement CU’s existing Business Research Division?

These two efforts could play out in one of several ways. Territorial disputes could create bitterness, with neither center cooperating with the other and missions overlapping. The resulting redundancy — and inevitable conflicting interpretations of data — would damage the goals of both.

The two centers could remain distinct and separate but share information and avoid overlapping in their efforts.

Lastly, the two efforts could merge, with one statewide center for discussion of the Colorado economy and growth patterns, including recommendations of possible solutions to sprawl.

Frankly, we prefer the second option, with CU, CSU, UNC and others determining the best possible missions for both a growth center and an economics center, with clear-cut goals for each and minimal territorial squabbles. It seems to us that the missions — growth and economics — while complementary, aren’t necessarily identical.

One envisions a statewide center for the study of growth in Colorado; the other has created a center for the study of the Colorado economy. Both efforts, by the University of Colorado and Colorado State University, respectively, could also fold in contributions from the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley and the University of Denver.

Such centers, operating cooperatively, would deserve the unqualified support of business and government leaders, as well as the general citizenry.

But let’s sort a few things out: Who will bring what to the table? Who will perform what role?

The center for the study of growth, an…

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