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 September 1, 1999

BCN director bound for West Africa trip

The Eye bids farewell to a big-hearted adventurer.

Brenda Ruth, director of the Boulder Community Network, a non-profit organization that provides other non-profits with Internet access and technological resources, is leaving BCN to pursue a certificate in international development in Cameroon.

Ruth, who volunteered in Africa a few years ago, made the decision to leave last spring, after receiving a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship. The West African scholarship program lasts for a year. It was Ruth’s desire to work with people and better their situations that initially brought her to Africa and to the BCN. “The same thing that brought me here is taking me away,” she said.

Joelle Bonnett will take Ruth’s place as director of the BCN. Bonnett says she plans to continue with the mission of the BCN.

It looks like New Age mac and cheese doesn’t measure up to the spicy standards of Boulder restaurant goers. After opening in March of last year, the Blue Plate Kitchen, 2525 Arapahoe Ave., is getting ready to close its doors.

Dave Query, owner of the Blue Plate Kitchen, knows a lot about restaurants. His meager beginnings at Mustard’s Last Stand in his hometown Boulder was just the start to a culinary discourse with Boulder. There was Lick Skillet, the bicyclists’ mountaintop haven, Q’s in the Boulderado, and a number of successful local restaurants including Zolo’s Grill, Jax’s Fish House and the newly established Rhumba.

But he didn’t comment on the reasons for closing the home-stylish restaurant. The Blue Plate is still open, but Query said he plans to close the restaurant sometime this month. The Eye will miss those huge ice creamy shakes.

The Boulder Chamber’s August after-hours on the Hill, complete with live music and a tent full of tasty goodies, was fun enough but there was one rock n’ roll distraction. Adam Duritz, lead singer for the Counting Crows, who were playing that night at the Fox, stood outside the theater giving out autographs and chatting with fans. Numerous younger business types (we won’t name any of them except for The Business Report’s Wendy Rice) were spotted cozying up to the dreadlocked crooner.

Boulder’s own Changes in Latitude (www.cil.com) got a nice plug in the Wall Street Journal, showing up in a the Catalog Critic’s column next to Orvis, L.L. Bean, Magellans and Travelsmith. “We like the small-town service we received from Changes in Latitude, a Boulder, Colo. outfitter that’s new to e-commerce,” writer Jonathan Weinbach said.

Business Card reprint hell: Now that the Daily Camera has decided to can circulation of weekly papers in the East County, The Eye ponders the reprint cost for employees’ cards, which in addition to the name of The Daily Camera, the Snapshot shopper, the BoulderNews Web site and the Rocky Mountain News, also carried the logos of the weeklies: Erie Examiner, Lafayette Ledger, Louisville Leader and Superior Citizen. The Camera reshaped its county shoppers into the weeklies immediately after competitor Longmont Times-Call’s purchased The Louisville Times, Lafayette News and Erie Review in July 1997.

The Eye can’t help commenting on a recent strange turn of events in Louisville. Here’s the scene: Eric and Gail Dixon waited in the empty building that was once their restaurant, an authentic Italian favorite. All the food had been thrown away, the equipment had been moved.

The plot thickens: But two hours before the sale closed, the Dixons received a phone call. The deal had fizzled.

Climax: David Myers, the Boulder businessman who had entered into an agreement to purchase the couple’s restaurant, Colacci’s Italian restaurant in Louisville, had changed his mind.

The call came on Wednesday, July 29, the date the Dixons had scheduled with Myers for a final walk-through of the restaurant. The Dixons have not been in touch with Myers but learned of the reasoning behind his decision to back out of the deal.

“He said his numbers didn’t match up,” Gail Dixon said.

Myers originally approached the couple to purchase the historic restaurant, a converted pool hall, with plans to turn it into a brewpub. He already had received a license from the Louisville Liquor Licensing Authority and named his soon-to-be restaurant the Redstone Brewery and Grill.

Resolution: The Dixons plan to keep the restaurant, which reopened Aug. 2, after being closed for a week, and The Eye rejoices that meatballs will reign once again.

The Eye bids farewell to a big-hearted adventurer.

Brenda Ruth, director of the Boulder Community Network, a non-profit organization that provides other non-profits with Internet access and technological resources, is leaving BCN to pursue a certificate in international development in Cameroon.

Ruth, who volunteered in Africa a few years ago, made the decision to leave last spring, after receiving a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship. The West African scholarship program lasts for a year. It was Ruth’s desire to work with people and better their situations that initially brought her to Africa and…

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