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 October 8, 1999

Holtzman names new technology team

DENVER — He is Colorado=s first Secretary of Technology. He heads the state=s International Trade Office and the Governor=s Office of Innovation and Technology.

And the latest responsibility for Marc Holtzman has been organizing the Governor=s Commission on Science and Technology, a venture expected to pull together key executives from Colorado technology companies and organizations to explore issues and find answers to lingering problems such as labor shortages and employee retention.

The new 55-member technology team, named in late September, will meet quarterly. It includes numerous representatives from Boulder County and Northern Colorado companies. They include: Paul Ray, Image Guided Technologies, Boulder; James Crowe, Level 3 Communications, Broomfield; Jerry Donahue, Boulder Technology Incubator; Lawrence Hambly, Sun Microsystems; David Hunter, BI, Boulder; Rick Patch, Sequel Venture Partners, Boulder; Richard Plumridge, Brobeck Phleger and Harrison, Broomfield; Mark Stevenson, E-M-Solutions, Longmont; James Watson, Breece Hill Technologies Inc, Boulder; David Weiss, StorageTek, Louisville; and Erich Windmuller, IBM, Boulder.

Holtzman has been refining details on the goals and policies, as well as building a base for a Colorado Institute of Technology. “The University of Colorado will play a major role,” Holtzman said.

For these duties, the state pays him $1 per year. For Holtzman, it=s enough.

Holtzman, 39, is a former investment banker who did well in Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States, most of the former Soviet Union. He was president of ABN AMRO Corporate Finance after it purchased Mees Pierson EurAmerica, which he had co-founded. ABN AMRO is one of the world=s 11 largest banks. It has assets of almost $400 billion and offices in 74 countries.

He also advised Salomon Brothers as it set up operations in Europe.

Holtzman worked in Europe and Russia for nine years. “Mentally it was a lot of hard work, but it was extremely fulfilling,” he said. “I had an opportunity to create something important.”

The chemistry between Holtzman and Gov. Bill Owens, who appointed him, was natural, given Holtzman=s background. “Owens has an interest in Russian history,” he said.

A 1983 graduate in economics at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., Holtzman cut his teeth on politics and government with the Reagan Administration. “That=s where I developed my interest in public service,” Holtzman said.

While working in Washington, D.C., Holtzman served on an advisory board for the Peace Corps. The board sent several hundred teachers to Poland and Hungary to teach English.

“It=s interesting how one thing leads to another,” Holtzman said. His business interests would later take him to Poland and Hungary, as well as the rest of Eastern Europe and Russia.

Holtzman was drawn to Colorado in 1994 when he visited a cousin living on the Western Slope.

He now divides his time between his home in Carbondale and his apartment in Denver.

“There are job shortages everywhere in technology,´ said Holtzman. “Those states that are proactive are going to succeed.”

Holtzman said it isn=t the quantity of jobs that will make the difference. It is the quality of jobs.

He points to the recent expansion of network equipment giant CISCO Systems Inc. in its Arapahoe County office north of Park Meadows mall. Cisco will be hiring 300 people, to bring its ranks to 500 employees in Colorado.

“These aren=t minimum-wage jobs,´ said Holtzman. “The average Cisco employee in Colorado makes $70,000 annually and holds stock options worth $180,000.”

San Jose, Calif.-based Cisco was one of the companies Holtzman visited with Gov. Owens last spring as they promoted Colorado in the Silicon Valley.

“There=s a connectivity between Denver-Boulder, Fort Collins and the rest of the state,´ said Holtzman. “The economic fortune experienced in the Front Range will spread within the next five years to other parts of the state, such as Pueblo and Grand Junction.”

His office continues the work of past administrations that have sought export markets. Holtzman said the emphasis is now on products produced by smaller Colorado companies.

Boulder provides a unique challenge. “Boulder is always going to be a special and desirable place,” Holtzman said. “We=ve got to be careful to retain the assets that make it special and desirable.”

DENVER — He is Colorado=s first Secretary of Technology. He heads the state=s International Trade Office and the Governor=s Office of Innovation and Technology.

And the latest responsibility for Marc Holtzman has been organizing the Governor=s Commission on Science and Technology, a venture expected to pull together key executives from Colorado technology companies and organizations to explore issues and find answers to lingering problems such as labor shortages and employee retention.

The new 55-member technology team, named in late September, will meet quarterly. It includes numerous representatives from Boulder County and Northern Colorado companies. They include: Paul Ray, Image Guided Technologies, Boulder;…

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