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 October 22, 1999

Dance Fest director resigns amid tight budget

End of an era? The beleaguered Colorado Dance Festival has been struck by yet another blow. Its artistic director, Michelle Hefner-Hayes, resigned from her position at the end of September. Marta Kern, the founder of the CDF, is serving as acting artistic director until the board makes a decision about a replacement. The festival’s budget has been shrinking for the past several years, precipitating the layoff of its full-time and part-time staff in August.

Boulder’s Careermag.com released a survey that says 71 percent of people think women use their gender to their advantage in the workplace and 20 percent of us have had an affair with someone we work with. The Eye is looking around the workplace very closely, especially after the report said 17 percent of us admit to having “lust in our hearts” about a co-worker. Gary Resnikoff, president of Careermag.com, said the response to the surveys, which try to monitor the pulse of a workplace, has been phenomenal.

The Eye spotted yet another news newcomer duking it out for readers and advertisers in Boulder County’s competitive media market. The Front Range Review, a weekly newspaper with a more generalized news/ feature focus, has joined the ranks of three other east county newspapers published by Longmont-based Lehman Communications: the Erie Review, the Louisville Times and the Lafayette News.

All four publications serve the areas of Louisville, Lafayette, Erie and Superior.

First published in May 1999, the weekly, published every Wednesday, covers a broader range of issues and interests than its more community-based sister papers.

Formerly called Coal Creek/ Rock Creek, the paper has a circulation of 9,900. Distribution is provided to non-subscribers in these areas for free, but does not extend to Boulder. Mary Snow is the editor of all four newspapers operating as the Colorado Hometown Newspapers group.

To loop or not to loop? One of the ideas being considered by an advisory committee recommending a redesign of Boulder’s Pearl Street Mall was to reverse the traffic direction on Spruce and Walnut streets, creating a one-way loop that would enable buses or cars to pull up and drop off passengers directly onto the mall. But changing traffic also might mean more studies and certainly more red tape working through the city’s transportation offices. So far now, the committee, which also just learned it must endure an “alteration” review with the city’s Landmarks Board, wants to concentrate on its design ideas, not traffic direction. For now at least, the loop debate appears to be on the back burner.

One downtown merchant asked the mall committee if they could avoid having art objects – like the old rustic wooden wheel there now – that must be chained down. Richard Foy of Communication Arts, a member of the design team, responded that if folk art like this must be locked and secured, maybe it could be a “historic rustic chain.”

The Eye says “congrats” to the Collage Children’s Museum and its director, Alison Moore, for being awarded a prestigious support grant of $59,925 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, IMLS. Out of 186 grants, only two were awarded in Colorado – the other to the Denver Museum of Natural History – not bad company to be in. IMLS calls the grant “a stamp of achievement that sparks vital public-private partnerships.”

A new twist on the corporate grind. Longmont’s TDA Advertising and Design has created a series of recruitment ads for Boulder-based game-maker VR1, portraying the city by the Flatirons as offering career potential equal to Boston or the Silicon Valley – plus an outdoor lifestyle. Entitled “A Different Place to Live and Work,” one of the ads shows four different vehicles, a VW bug and a couple of SUVs, all with racks holding kayaks and mountain bikes. Another shows a rock wall, with a sign taped onto it, pointing up and reading “Company Picnic.” The ads will run in computer titles like “Next Generation” or “PC Gamer.”

Boulder’s Dandelion Restaurant, a Kevin Taylor restaurant, and Alice’s Restaurant at Gold Lake Mountain Resort & Spa, were both recognized with an “Award of Excellence” in the Sept. 30 issue of Wine Spectator. The award recognizes the restaurant’s staff’s knowledge of wines as well as the assortment of wines and the “harmony” of wines with menu selections.

Tom’s Tavern owner Tom Eldridge, along with the Center for People with Disabilities, has dedicated the ramp at the downtown Boulder restaurant to Al Goldsmith, a disability rights activist who was struck by a truck and killed on Oct. 6, 1998 while traveling in his wheelchair. Goldsmith, who loved the tavern’s cheeseburgers, had lobbied Eldridge, who is also a Boulder city councilman, to install the ramp. The ramp was installed in January 1998.

End of an era? The beleaguered Colorado Dance Festival has been struck by yet another blow. Its artistic director, Michelle Hefner-Hayes, resigned from her position at the end of September. Marta Kern, the founder of the CDF, is serving as acting artistic director until the board makes a decision about a replacement. The festival’s budget has been shrinking for the past several years, precipitating the layoff of its full-time and part-time staff in August.

Boulder’s Careermag.com released a survey that says 71 percent of people think women use their gender to their advantage in the workplace and 20 percent of us…

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