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 October 22, 1999

The Eye: Voter’s guide keeps county on its toes

Maybe it was a botched pas de deux between the Larimer County Clerk’s Office and the printing company that produced voter-information packets mailed to every household in the county.

Whatever the case, County Clerk Myrna Rodenberger must have done an entrechat quatre when she saw the Eye-catching headline on the mailer: “State and Local Ballet Issues.”

In the newspaper business, a mistake like that is called a “head bust.” Over at the clerk’s office, it’s called a … well, a mistake.

“At election time, 99.9 percent accuracy is a disaster,” Rodenberger said. “It’s got to be perfect.”

Except for the headline, it was – almost. Rodenberger’s staff on Oct. 7 mailed a correction to some of the fine print in the ballet, er, ballot sample. It seems the sales-tax percentage increase for the county fairgrounds initiative was off by a hair.

Maybe somebody at the clerk’s office ought to be on the business end of a fouetté, defined by The Eye’s ballet dictionary as a “spin in which the body is propelled by the whipping motion of a raised leg.”

” ” ”

The Eye wants Dave’s hours. Or maybe not.

Like most other businesses, Dave’s Locksmithing on South Mason Street in Fort Collins posts hours on the front door.

Here’s the message:

“Open most days about 9 or 10, occasionally as early as 7, but some days as late as 11 or 12. We close about 5:30 or 6, occasionally about 4 or 5, but sometimes as late as 11 or 12. Some days or afternoons we aren’t here at all, and lately we’ve been here just about all the time, except when we’re someplace else.”

Maybe it was a botched pas de deux between the Larimer County Clerk’s Office and the printing company that produced voter-information packets mailed to every household in the county.

Whatever the case, County Clerk Myrna Rodenberger must have done an entrechat quatre when she saw the Eye-catching headline on the mailer: “State and Local Ballet Issues.”

In the newspaper business, a mistake like that is called a “head bust.” Over at the clerk’s office, it’s called a … well, a mistake.

“At election time, 99.9 percent accuracy is a disaster,” Rodenberger said. “It’s got to be perfect.”

Except for the headline, it was –…

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