[copperpress-advertserve-ad-reload zone="3"]
 November 5, 1999

As economy booms, movers say they’re busier than ever

When business is booming, the moving business is, too.

That’s the word from Boulder County and Denver Metro area movers and less-than-truckload movers (LTL) that, for the last few years, are busier than usual with business and residential moves.

Golden Van Lines of Longmont had a banner year in 1998. Director of Business Administration Larry Owens said the company saw a 50 percent increase in inbound storage over the previous year. The increase was due to mass moves of employees by companies such as Sun Microsystems, Seagate and Level 3, he said.

“What we’ve seen are mostly corporate relocations,” Owens said. “So far this year inbound has gone down. This has to do with the mass moves being complete.”

While Golden Van Lines isn’t a big player in business moving in the Denver metro area, Owens said the company does well in the north and west areas of the state.

“We have seen a 12 percent increase in moves in Northern Colorado, in Boulder, Weld and Larimer counties,” he said.

Viking Freight Inc., an LTL mover that concentrates on business moves of high-tech equipment and delivering to distribution centers, has seen a 20 percent growth rate from 1998 to 1999. The company also has significantly increased staff and equipment within its 62 Western state service area, according to Keith Lovetro, vice president of marketing. The increase can be attributed to many things, including the closure of Nation’s Way, a competitor formerly based in Colorado.

Business at Baileys Allied Van Lines is going well, according to Clint Dudley, general manager.

“A lot of our business is moving employees. Office and industrial moves are on an upward trend,” Dudley said. The trend was personalized at Baileys when five extra employees were brought on to handle the work. “Over the last six years we’ve seen about 3 to 4 percent a year growth,” he said. His company, too, benefited from the big corporate moves by Level 3 and the rest.

Boulder Valley Transfer, one of the oldest moving companies in Boulder County, said the upward trend in the economy often translates into staff shortages.

“I’m constantly looking for new movers,´ said Chris Klatt, president and owner of Boulder Valley Transfer. “I could do more business if I could find more men.” Klatt has 15 movers. He could probably employ and additional 10 full time, he said.

Klatt said he’s doubled business in the last three years. Many of his clients are businesses that have grown out of their current locations and need to relocate in another part of Boulder or the county.

Wallets are fatter for smaller movers, such as the Moving Connection. Dave Moloney, owner, said he’s doubled full- and part-time staff in the last four years. Commercial moves are creeping up on residential. Revenues for the Moving Connection increased about $100,000 from 1998 to 1999, he said.

When business is booming, the moving business is, too.

That’s the word from Boulder County and Denver Metro area movers and less-than-truckload movers (LTL) that, for the last few years, are busier than usual with business and residential moves.

Golden Van Lines of Longmont had a banner year in 1998. Director of Business Administration Larry Owens said the company saw a 50 percent increase in inbound storage over the previous year. The increase was due to mass moves of employees by companies such as Sun Microsystems, Seagate and Level 3, he said.

“What we’ve seen are mostly corporate relocations,” Owens said.…

[copperpress-advertserve-ad-reload zone="3"]

Related Content

[copperpress-advertserve-ad-interstitial zone="30"]