[copperpress-advertserve-ad-reload zone="3"]
 November 19, 1999

Post pops ads into Planet; Paul’s Antiques for sale

The Eye hardly ever blinks anymore when one daily tries to get an edge on the other in Denver’s always intense newspaper war. Since the Daily Camera joined the Rocky Mountain News under Scripps ownership, the papers have tried out several cost-saving moves, including having circulation folks deliver both papers. The result: Many disgruntled subscribers who no longer get their paper on time. Then the Rocky began inserting its Sunday travel and jobs classifieds sections into the Camera.

Now the Denver Post has found a way to strike back by running part of its jobs classifieds into the Boulder Planet, a weekly that’s been the nemesis of the Camera since its start. The Post also circulates the Planet to Boulder subscribers on Thursdays as part of what it describes as a “working relationship” between the two publications. No financial details of the deal have been revealed.

Post officials say the inserted classifieds section is an added benefit to job-searching Planet readers. The Planet, still owned by Doug Greene but now seeking its own financial footing since Greene sold his natural foods publishing company New Hope Communications, tells the Eye it has every intention of continuing to be part of the local media offerings, with expansion plans in the works.

The famed Paul’s Antiques and Used Furniture Store, a staple of the front range landscape for decades, is for sale, as clearly evidenced by a for-sale sign in the front window. Located on Main Street in Longmont, Paul’s owner – Carol Bandenbos — would not comment, and employees were more than tight-lipped as well. Why the secrecy about a bunch of antiques and knickknacks, the Eye wonders?

In the first of many-to-come 2000 economic forecasts, Colorado State University’s John Olienyk, associate professor in the Department of Finance and Real Estate, gave an upbeat look ahead to customers and guests of FirstNational Bank of Longmont.

With the United States in its 104th month of economic expansion, the economy still chugging along with a 4 percent growth rate and unemployment continuing at near 30-year lows, it’s tough, Olienyk said, to find many negatives. Yes, there’s always the threat of an overheating economy and inflation or some type of “external” shock that can’t be predicted, but right now the picture remains pretty rosy.

With the bulk of Colorado’s economic activity centered along the Front Range, the local forecast is not too bad either. High-tech growth continues to give us a more diverse economic base. And despite the continuing woes of finding labor, the state remains able to attract new talent. Colorado’s population growth, at 1.9 percent, is nearly twice the U.S. average of 1 percent.

Longmont itself, Olienyk pointed out, today probably has the largest stock of affordable housing in Boulder County, enabling it to house many of its own employees and prevent some of the traffic woes other cities are experiencing from a high number of commuters.

It’s safe to fly over New Year’s day, right? Everything with Y2K is totally under control. Then why, the Y2K-ready Eye wonders, has American Airlines announced it will be canceling some of its flights over the New Year holiday? The announcement makes no mention of Y2K at all; it simply says the airline anticipates a “decrease in passenger loads.”

The Eye has a friend who just hit 5 of 6 in Colorado’s lottery when it was in the $10 million territory and now insists he’s “on a roll.” But as a friendly reminder to all of you who think the big payoff is just around the corner, Primerica notes that its recent survey found that millions of Americans actually believe they will do better for the retirement “nest egg” by playing lotteries or sweepstakes rather than saving or investing on a regular basis. Fact is, Primerica says, the average net worth of U.S. households, particularly in the debt-burdened middle class, is extremely low.

And speaking of that suffering middle class, The Eye was pleased to receive an invite to a Merrill Lynch financial workshop offering up “Investment Strategies for the Year 2000.” The Eye was already to hop on his/her/its alternative transport and scoot right over until noticing the fine print: “Participation requires the ability to invest a minimum of $100,000.” Oh well, back to reading Money magazine.

The Eye hardly ever blinks anymore when one daily tries to get an edge on the other in Denver’s always intense newspaper war. Since the Daily Camera joined the Rocky Mountain News under Scripps ownership, the papers have tried out several cost-saving moves, including having circulation folks deliver both papers. The result: Many disgruntled subscribers who no longer get their paper on time. Then the Rocky began inserting its Sunday travel and jobs classifieds sections into the Camera.

Now the Denver Post has found a way to strike back by running part of its jobs classifieds into…

[copperpress-advertserve-ad-reload zone="3"]

Related Content

[copperpress-advertserve-ad-interstitial zone="30"]