[copperpress-advertserve-ad-reload zone="3"]
 November 19, 1999

State ranked No. 2 for business climate

Wyoming Business

Wyoming has been ranked second in the country for overall best business climate by Expansion Management Magazine.

Wyoming trails only Texas in the rankings, which appear in the magazine’s October issue. And the ranking is good news to John Reardon, CEO of the Wyoming Business Council, the state’s new economic development entity.

“We are pleased to see the recognition of the positive business environment in Wyoming created by state and local government,” Reardon said, noting that Wyoming has moved up to third nationally in the rate of new job growth and personal income growth.

Dubois’ contract extended

Laramie — University of Wyoming trustees have extended UW President Philip Dubois’ contract through 2004, saying they wanted to recognize Dubois’ accomplishments and leadership.

Last year, the trustees had extended his original one-year contract through 2001. Trustees president Hank True of Casper said Dubois’ performance during the past year was extremely positive, and he did an excellent job.

Dubois currently earns $150,000 a year, and the trustees are developing a new compensation package this fall.

Dubois said that he’s glad he came to UW from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where he was a political science professor, vice chancellor and provost. He said the UW job is unique because it is the state’s only four-year institution, so its president can have a big impact.

Dubois also has been elected to serve as the chair and president of the Mountain West Conference from July 1, 1999, through June 30, 2000, succeeding Colorado State University president Al Yates, who guided the MWC during its formation by eight former Western Athletic Conference schools.

Dubois said that the Mountain West Conference will be exciting and competitive, and dedicated to excellence in academics as well as athletics.

UW tops contribution record

Laramie — For the second year in a row, alumni and friends of the University of Wyoming have given their support at a record level, committing more than $18.3 million for fiscal year 1998-99.

This year’s total eclipsed the previous year’s $15.4 million record by 19 percent. More than 20,700 donors contributed to UW’s success and helped send the UW Annual Fund to $1.15 million for the first time, exceeding last year’s all-time high of $826,000. The Annual Fund enables deans, faculty, and University President Philip L. Dubois to support projects and special needs not funded by state dollars.

Racing industry back on track

Wyoming’s horse racing industry has come up lame, and a special task force is being assembled to try to do something to fix it.

With only one track operating (Wyoming Downs in Evanston), racing was curtailed this past summer from 52 days to just 27.

In 1993, when four tracks were operating, total wagering was $3.6 million. Last year’s wagers were $1.4 million with tracks operating in Casper as well as Evanston.

Frank Lamb, executive director of the Wyoming Pari-Mutuel Commission, said that the task force will look for causes of the decline — including gambling in Colorado and South Dakota and resumption of horse racing in Colorado — and try to get racing resumed in Casper, Gillette and Rock Springs next year.

The task force includes representatives from the Governor’s Office, Legislature, Wyoming Business Council, University of Wyoming, Wyoming Horse Council, Wyoming All-Breeds Racing Association and the American Quarter Horse Association, as well as counties with racetracks.

Hospital employees unionize

wheatland — Employees at Platte County Memorial Hospital have narrowly agreed to join a union, making them the first nonfederal hospital employees in the state to unionize.

Employees voted 70-62 to join the Operating Engineers Union Local 3, and pro-union employees said staffing issues probably were more important than wage issues in the outcome.

The union campaign generated some hard feelings. Hospital administrators opposed the union, saying it would add a new layer of negotiations between the hospital and its employees.

But pro-union employees accused hospital administrators of trying to intimidate workers by suggesting the hospital might close if it unionized.

Union officials say two other health care facilities in Wyoming have contacted them expressing interest in unionization. However, state hospital officials say they don’t expect many more unionized hospitals, if any, because state law discourages unionization of publicly owned and operated hospitals.

Platte County Memorial is owned by the county but leased to and operated by Lutheran Health Services.

Wyoming Business

Wyoming has been ranked second in the country for overall best business climate by Expansion Management Magazine.

Wyoming trails only Texas in the rankings, which appear in the magazine’s October issue. And the ranking is good news to John Reardon, CEO of the Wyoming Business Council, the state’s new economic development entity.

“We are pleased to see the recognition of the positive business environment in Wyoming created by state and local government,” Reardon said, noting that Wyoming has moved up to third nationally in the rate of new job growth and personal income growth.

Dubois’ contract extended

Laramie — University of Wyoming…

[copperpress-advertserve-ad-reload zone="3"]

Related Content

[copperpress-advertserve-ad-interstitial zone="30"]