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ARCHIVED  November 19, 1999

Windsor Door & Millwork will expand

WINDSOR — Windsor Door & Millwork Inc. of Eaton is opening the door on plans to construct an 11,500-square-foot facility at the Windsor Tech Center. The building, which would occupy a 1.25 acre plot in Windsor, will triple the company’s size.

“We’re pretty much busting up the seams,” reported Brian Urdiales, sales and finance manager for the company. “We’re almost going to be tripling what we’re in right now. We looked at different places in Weld, but we got the best price in Windsor. And besides, Windsor goes with the name of our company.”

Windsor Door & Millwork hopes to make the move by Aug. 1, 2000, but thus far has not found a contractor for the job, Urdiales said. “We’re not sure who it’s going to be yet, but we’re in the process of interviewing contractors. We should know by Thanksgiving.”

Plans to hire 12 new employees with the move would more than double the Windsor Door & Millwork’s current employment base of 10, and the company has already purchased new machinery that will make its operation “faster and a lot more efficient,” Urdiales said, adding that the company plans to occupy its new facility for 12 months or so before it “starts working on another expansion.”

Bob Bogdanski founded Windsor Door & Millwork in the early 1990s as a manufacturer of custom-designed copper-clad wooden doors and windows. “He believes quality comes first in all of his projects and of all the windows we have built, we have never had any problems with any of them; they all operate perfectly,´ said company president Eleanor Urdiales.

The doors and windows manufactured by Bogdanski and Windsor Door & Millwork are intended for very high-end homes, she explained: “The houses the windows go in are no less than $5 million, and no less than 15,000-square-feet in size. They are very high end.”

But Windsor Door & Millwork has its hands full with orders coming in from all over the United States, and its efforts to expand are indicative of the growth within its specialized corner of the market. “It is a unique product, a one-of-a-kind type of window,” Eleanor Urdiales noted,” and the demand is out there.”

The demand, perhaps, but not so much the competition — Windsor Door & Millwork is one of only a handful of companies in the United States and Canada that produce copper-clad wooden doors and windows. Remarkably, of the five, two are based in Northern Colorado: Point-Five Windows Inc. of Fort Collins is the other.

“I don’t know what Windsor’s back orders are like, but we are at capacity and are fully contracted out through April, 2000 — and we do no advertising. It’s all word of mouth,” reported Point-Five Windows president and owner Dave Lundahl.

Lundahl agreed that much of both companies’ success — Point-Five Windows recorded sales in excess of $4 million in 1998 — is owed to the flourishing economy, but he does not expect the niche market’s growth to falter any time soon.

“Certainly there are more high-dollar homes being built now and a lot more people with higher disposable incomes as baby boomers work towards retirement,” he said, “but that shouldn’t diminish for some time.”

WINDSOR — Windsor Door & Millwork Inc. of Eaton is opening the door on plans to construct an 11,500-square-foot facility at the Windsor Tech Center. The building, which would occupy a 1.25 acre plot in Windsor, will triple the company’s size.

“We’re pretty much busting up the seams,” reported Brian Urdiales, sales and finance manager for the company. “We’re almost going to be tripling what we’re in right now. We looked at different places in Weld, but we got the best price in Windsor. And besides, Windsor goes with the name of our company.”

Windsor Door & Millwork hopes to make the…

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