Longmont chamber supports two tax issues

LONGMONT – The Longmont Area Chamber of Commerce is supporting the marijuana tax and the public safety tax, both of which are on the 2017 ballot.

The marijuana tax is an additional sales tax at 3 percent on any retail sales of marijuana in the city of Longmont. Only customers purchasing marijuana pay the tax, according to a press release from the chamber. Half of the money will be used for city services to cover licensing and permitting of marijuana stores, and the other half of collected funds will be used for affordable-housing needs.

“Marijuana retail sales are new for Longmont; it’s important that expected and perhaps unexpected costs are covered,” the chamber said in a statement. “Our members in the marijuana retail sector support this tax. Collected funds will cover costs but also address affordable housing needs, something the chamber will be actively addressing with our economic partners,” said Michelle Brietzke, chairwoman of the chamber’s board of directors.

The public-safety tax will be used to increase Longmont’s police force as well as firefighters, dispatchers and support staff. In addition, increased funds will be used to purchase equipment and facilities to further enhance safety in Longmont, the chamber said in its statement of support.

LONGMONT – The Longmont Area Chamber of Commerce is supporting the marijuana tax and the public safety tax, both of which are on the 2017 ballot.

The marijuana tax is an additional sales tax at 3 percent on any retail sales of marijuana in the city of Longmont. Only customers purchasing marijuana pay the tax, according to a press release from the chamber. Half of the money will be used for city services to cover licensing and permitting of marijuana stores, and the other half of collected funds will be used for affordable-housing needs.

“Marijuana retail sales are new for Longmont; it’s important that expected and perhaps unexpected costs are covered,” the chamber said in a statement. “Our members in the marijuana retail sector support this tax. Collected funds will cover costs but also address affordable housing needs, something the chamber will be actively addressing with our economic partners,” said Michelle Brietzke, chairwoman of the chamber’s board of directors.

The public-safety tax will be used to increase Longmont’s police force as well as firefighters, dispatchers and support staff. In addition, increased funds will be used to purchase equipment and facilities to further enhance safety in Longmont, the chamber said in its statement of support.