Green roof rules may be clarified

DENVER — Denver voters this week approved a new “green roof” development requirement for commercial buildings, but it remains to be seen what shape that requirement will take.

It may be months before city officials finalize city code language, including what will be required and which buildings will be affected, according to a report in the Denver Business Journal.

“I think we need to change some of the wording, get more specific about what qualifies as an exemption for existing buildings,” Brandon Reitheimer, who spearheaded the Denver Green Roof Initiative, told the journal on Wednesday, hours after initiative 301 appeared to pass.

Rietheimer said backers of the initiative always intended to include exemptions to the new rules, “but it wasn’t written as clearly as it could have been.”  

Early Wednesday, with 96,000 votes counted, the “yes” vote was ahead by more than four percentage points, 52.2 percent to 47.8 percent.

The city’s charter allows the city council to make changes to voter-approved initiatives — or repeal them entirely — six months after the election and with a two-thirds majority. The council can act any time after the first six months, and up to 10 years after the election.

The initiative as written requires buildings in Denver that are 25,000 square feet or larger to install green roof features, such as rooftop gardens, or a combination of gardens and solar-power panels.

 

DENVER — Denver voters this week approved a new “green roof” development requirement for commercial buildings, but it remains to be seen what shape that requirement will take.

It may be months before city officials finalize city code language, including what will be required and which buildings will be affected, according to a report in the Denver Business Journal.

“I think we need to change some of the wording, get more specific about what qualifies as an exemption for existing buildings,” Brandon Reitheimer, who spearheaded the Denver Green Roof Initiative, told the journal on Wednesday, hours after initiative 301 appeared to pass.

Rietheimer said backers of the initiative always intended to include exemptions to the new rules, “but it wasn’t written as clearly as it could have been.”  

Early Wednesday, with 96,000 votes counted, the “yes” vote was ahead by more than four percentage points, 52.2 percent to 47.8 percent.

The city’s charter allows the city council to make changes to voter-approved initiatives — or repeal them entirely — six months after the election and with a two-thirds majority. The council can act any time after the first six months, and up to 10 years after the election.

The initiative as written requires buildings in Denver that are 25,000 square feet or larger to install green roof features, such as rooftop gardens, or a combination of gardens and solar-power panels.