Indian Peaks Marketplace approved by Lafayette City Council

LAFAYETTE — The city council approved the Indian Peaks Marketplace Tuesday night, a 53,000-square-foot commercial development on two lots near Baseline Road and Colorado Highway 42.

The council approved 5-2 a rezoning to Community Business from Developing Resource for the southern of the two lots and 5-2 the final planned unit development for the full project. Councilwoman Tonya Briggs and Councilman Tim Barnes voted against both.

The 2.86-acre north lot of the project will add 15,746 square feet of retail and restaurant space to the southwest corner of Baseline Road and Highway 42. The 3.55-acre south lot will add 37,995 square feet of office, retail and restaurant space to the northwest corner of Colorado Highway 42 and Paschal Drive. The two lots will be separated by a 14.36-acre parcel owned by a neighboring homeowners association.

Nearby residents voiced concerns about traffic increases creating potentially dangerous situations; Briggs echoed those worries.

“I have many concerns,” she said. “The most pressing of them is safety.”

However, other council members voiced support for improvements to a nearby RTD stop that will accompany the project. 

“I think that RTD stop has needed some attention for a while,” said Councilwoman Chelsea Behenna. 

Lafayette mayor Jamie Harkins said the project aligns with the city’s comprehensive plan and its residents’ stated desire for more walkable neighborhoods. 

“When I think to what we have heard throughout the process of coming up with our comprehensive plan, people said they wanted commercial developments close to residential areas,” Harkins said. “They wanted a walkable, bikeable city. That can’t happen unless we have things for people to walk or bike to. I think people will see how great it is to have a walkable neighborhood center you can go to without needing your car.”

Indian Peaks Marketplace is being developed by Boulder-based W.W. Reynolds Cos. 

This was the second time the project went before the City Council. In August 2020, the Lafayette Planning Commission denied the preliminary development plan for Indian Peaks Marketplace on grounds that it didn’t meet the city’s criteria for mixed-use building complexes nor its Comprehensive Plan Policy. The developer appealed the decision to the City Council, and in October 2020 the council overturned the Planning Commission’s decision. 

The development schedule for Indian Peaks Marketplace calls for completion by summer 2022.

LAFAYETTE — The city council approved the Indian Peaks Marketplace Tuesday night, a 53,000-square-foot commercial development on two lots near Baseline Road and Colorado Highway 42.

The council approved 5-2 a rezoning to Community Business from Developing Resource for the southern of the two lots and 5-2 the final planned unit development for the full project. Councilwoman Tonya Briggs and Councilman Tim Barnes voted against both.

The 2.86-acre north lot of the project will add 15,746 square feet of retail and restaurant space to the southwest corner of Baseline Road and Highway 42. The 3.55-acre south lot will add 37,995 square feet of office, retail and restaurant space to the northwest corner of Colorado Highway 42 and Paschal Drive. The two lots will be separated by a 14.36-acre parcel owned by a neighboring homeowners association.

Nearby residents voiced concerns about traffic increases creating potentially dangerous situations; Briggs echoed those worries.

“I have many concerns,” she said. “The most pressing of them is safety.”

However, other council members voiced support for improvements to a nearby RTD stop that will accompany the project. 

“I think that RTD stop has needed some attention for a while,” said Councilwoman Chelsea Behenna. 

Lafayette mayor Jamie Harkins said the project aligns with the city’s comprehensive plan and its residents’ stated desire for more walkable neighborhoods. 

“When I think to what we have heard throughout the process of coming up with our comprehensive plan, people said they wanted commercial developments close to residential areas,” Harkins said. “They wanted a walkable, bikeable city. That can’t happen…